Chapter 2: Delivering Your Message

15 Conclusion

image of a woman with short curly hair and a pencil above her ear

 

Returning to Abe’s desire to learn more about informal conversation with colleagues in a Canadian context, what have you learned about language and communication that might help you be a good support for Abe’s learning?

 

Check Your Knowledge

Glossary

Auxiliary – Auxiliary messages refer to the intentional and unintentional ways a primary message is communicated. This may include vocal inflection, gestures and posture, or rate of speech that influences the interpretation or perception of your message.
Connotative – The connotative meaning is often not found in the dictionary but in the community of users itself.
Context – Contextual rules govern meaning and word choice according to context and social custom.
Denotative – The denotative meaning is the common meaning, often found in the dictionary.
Doublespeak – Doublespeak is the deliberate use of words to disguise, obscure, or change meaning.
Euphemism – A euphemism involves substituting an acceptable word for an offensive, controversial, or unacceptable one that conveys the same or similar meaning.
Jargon – Jargon is an occupation-specific language used by people in a given profession.
Language – A system of symbols, words, and/or gestures used to communicate meaning.
Offensive Language – Some language is offensive and has no place in the workplace.
Primary – Primary messages refer to the intentional content, both verbal and nonverbal. These are the words or ways you choose to express yourself and communicate your message.
Secondary – Primary messages refer to the intentional content, both verbal and nonverbal. These are the words or ways you choose to express yourself and communicate your message.
Semantics – Semantic rules govern the meaning of words and how to interpret them (Martinich, 1996)
Slang – The use of existing or newly invented words to take the place of standard or traditional words with the intent of adding an unconventional, nonstandard, humorous, or rebellious effect.
Syntax – Syntactic rules govern the order of words in a sentence.
Triangle of Meaning – A model of communication that indicates the relationship among a thought, symbol, and referent and highlights the indirect relationship between the symbol and referent.

Additional Resources

Toastmasters International – Public speaking tips: https://www.toastmasters.org/resources/public-speaking-tips

Harvard psychology professor Steven Pinker is one of today’s most innovative authorities on language. Explore reviews of books about language Pinker has published. http://stevenpinker.com/taxonomy/term/4265

The “I Have a Dream” speech by Martin Luther King Jr. is one of the most famous speeches of all time. View it on video and read the text. http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/mlkihaveadream.htm

Visit Goodreads and learn about one of the most widely used style manuals, The Chicago Manual of Style. http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/103362.The_Chicago_Manual_of_Style

Chapter References

All images used in this chapter (unless otherwise indicated) are licensed CC 0 from Pixabay.com

Hayakawa, S. I., & Hayakawa, A. R. (1990). Language in thought and action. Orlando, FL: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.

Odgen, C., & Richards, I. (1932). The meaning of meaning: A study of the influence of language upon thought and of the science of symbolism. New York, NY: Harcourt Brace World.

Pearson, J., & Nelson, P. (2000). An introduction to human communication: Understanding and sharing. Boston, MA: McGraw-Hill.

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