Engaging with Diverse Communities

Here we learn from Lowine Hill, University of Waterloo and Madu Galappaththi, University of Waterloo on respectful engagement.

Explore the Social Identity Wheel

Engaging with positionality and identity requires engaging with your own identity and positionality. To help understand who is involved in community engagement, it is useful to consider the following questions:

  1. Identities you think about most often;
  2. Identities you think least about;
  3. Your own identities you would like to learn more about; and
  4. Identities that have the strongest effect on how you see yourself as a person.
Social Identity Wheel (Adapted from "Voices of Discovery", Intergroup Relations Center, Arizona State University) 1. Identities you think about most often 2. Identities you think about least often 3. Your own identities you would like to learn more about. 4. Identities that have the strongest effect on how you see yourself as a person. This list is cricled with: Race, Ethnicity, Socio-economic Class, Gender, Sexual Orientation, Age, National Origin, Fire Language, Physical, Emptional, Developmental Ability, Religion or Spirirtiual Affilaiation

Download a copy of the Social Identity Wheel

License

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Building Sustainable Communities: The Impact of Engagement by Ryan Plummer; Amanda Smits; Samantha Witkowski; Bridget McGlynn; Derek Armitage; Ella-Kari Muhl; and Jodi Johnston is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, except where otherwise noted.

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