1 Critical Thinking and Evaluating Sources

Critical Thinking and Evaluating Sources

Bias has the potential to influence beliefs and decision-making. To help mitigate flaws in thinking there are several resources or methods you can use to process information and evaluate resources. In this text we use the CRAAP method of evaluating information, but there are several other tools that are just as useful.

The CRAAP Method of Evaluating Sources

In the age of ‘new media’ and ‘fake news’ it is important to be able to critically evaluate information. If you are unsure of the validity of what you are reading, The CRAAP Method is a simple acronym that will simplify the way you evaluate information.

The CRAAP method for evaluating sources
The CRAAP test is a test to check the reliability of sources across academic disciplines.

The Hierarchy of Scientific Evidence

The hierarchy of research evidence
Evaluating research involves ranking studies based on their methods. Meta-Analysis and systematic reviews sit at the top of the pyramid, followed by randomized control trials and observational studies. Expert opinion and anecdotal experience are ranked at the bottom.

Key Takeaways

The hierarchy of evidence pyramid provides an overview of diverse types and levels of scientific research. Systematic reviews sit at the top of the pyramid, followed by randomized control trials and observational studies. Expert opinion and anecdotal experience are ranked at the bottom. If you are unsure of the validity of what you are reading, The CRAAP Method is a simple acronym that will simplify the way you evaluate information.

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